"We all look through family albums. We all hear stories at the dinner table. ... They become incorporated into what we believe we actually remember." — Scott Fraser

"We all look through family albums. We all hear stories at the dinner table. ... They become incorporated into what we believe we actually remember." — Scott Fraser Marc Grimberg/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Marc Grimberg/Getty Images
"We all look through family albums. We all hear stories at the dinner table. ... They become incorporated into what we believe we actually remember." — Scott Fraser

"We all look through family albums. We all hear stories at the dinner table. ... They become incorporated into what we believe we actually remember." — Scott Fraser

Marc Grimberg/Getty Images

Memory Games

Memory is malleable, dynamic and elusive. In this hour, TED speakers discuss how a nimble memory can improve your life, and how a frail one might ruin someone else's.

Memory is malleable, dynamic and elusive. In this hour, TED speakers discuss how a nimble memory can improve your life, and how a frail one might ruin someone else's.

Forensic psychologist Scott Fraser says, "all of our memories, put simply, are reconstructed memories." TEDxUSC hide caption

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Can Eyewitnesses Create Memories?

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Daniel Kahneman says, "we tend to confuse memories with the real experience that gave rise to those memories." James Duncan Davidson/TED / James Duncan Davidson hide caption

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How Do Experiences Become Memories?

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Joshua Foer says that one past memory champion developed a technique to remember more than 4,000 binary digits in half an hour. James Duncan Davidson hide caption

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Can Anyone Learn To Be A Master Memorizer?

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