Feline Lovers Turn Out For Internet Cat Video Festival

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Last summer, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis hosted the first Internet Cat Video Festival. It was so popular it went viral and the show went on the road. Over the weekend, more than 6,000 people turned out at the Oakland Internet Cat Video Festival.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Today's Last Word In Business is, the cat's meow. Last summer, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis hosted the first-ever Internet Cat Video Festival. Yes, that happened. The festival featured 70 minutes of Internet cat videos.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

You may know the favorites: "Keyboard Cat," "Very Angry Cat" and Internet sensation "Grumpy Cat." The festival is so popular, it went viral; the show went on the road. And over the weekend, more than 6,000 people turned out at the Oakland Internet Cat Video Festival, coordinated by Issabella Shields.

ISSABELLA SHIELDS: Dusty the Klepto Cat, from San Mateo, was there. He was the celebrity cat onsite. Many other people brought from their cat on leashes. And then in carriers, they had like carriers on wheels, so they had like these little limousines for their kitties.

GREENE: You know Dusty the Klepto Cat, right? OK, maybe not. Well, we can tell you, he has a Wikipedia entry.

INSKEEP: It said Dusty was caught stealing 16 carwash mitts.

GREENE: Eighteen shoes, 73 socks...

INSKEEP: ...213 dish towels - and more. He broke out of YouTube fame, and ended up on David Letterman.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

GREENE: And I'm David Greene.

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