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Hipsters Singled Out For Being Annoying

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Hipsters Singled Out For Being Annoying

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Hipsters Singled Out For Being Annoying

Hipsters Singled Out For Being Annoying

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A new report from Public Policy Polling finds only 16 percent of Americans think hipsters are still hip. More than a quarter of those polled said hipsters should have to pay a special tax for being annoying.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Hipsters: They're known for roasting their own coffee, riding vintage bicycles, listening to vinyl records from obscure bands, and now also for being unpopular. A new report from Public Policy Polling finds only 16 percent of Americans think hipsters are still hip. More than a quarter of those polled said hipsters should have to pay a special tax for being so annoying.

Hipsters: uncool, misunderstood, pushed to the fringe. Really? It's like they wrote the report. It's MORNING EDITION.

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