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Conn. Train Travelers Brace For Commuting Chaos

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Conn. Train Travelers Brace For Commuting Chaos

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Conn. Train Travelers Brace For Commuting Chaos

Conn. Train Travelers Brace For Commuting Chaos

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Officials in Connecticut are warning commuters to be prepared for travel chaos Monday and throughout the week. They say lengthy detours and hours of backups are likely as workers repair damage caused by the collision of two passenger trains on a portion of the New York-New Haven line on Friday.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Authorities in Connecticut are warning commuters to expect even more chaos than usual this morning. The nation's busiest rail line is being repaired after significant damage from a crash. On Friday, two trains collided. It happened between Fairfield and Bridgeport, Connecticut, about 50 miles outside of New York City. Seventy people were injured. About 30,000 daily commuters will experience lengthy detours and hours of traffic delays. Train service on a portion of the New York-New Haven Line has been halted indefinitely.

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