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Venezuela Suffers Through Toilet Paper Shortage

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Venezuela Suffers Through Toilet Paper Shortage

Business

Venezuela Suffers Through Toilet Paper Shortage

Venezuela Suffers Through Toilet Paper Shortage

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/186195969/186196465" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Venezuela is rich in oil, but relies on imports for many basic goods — including toothpaste, soap and toilet paper. For weeks now the country has had a chronic toilet paper shortage. Lawmakers voted to approve a $79 million credit to the government to resolve the issue.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is causing a bit of a stink in Venezuela, that would be a toilet paper shortage.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Venezuela is rich in oil, but relies on imports for many basic goods - including toothpaste, soap and yes, toilet paper. For weeks now, the country has had chronic toilet paper shortage.

MONTAGNE: Lawmakers voted to approve a $79 million credit to the government to resolve the issue. They aim to initially import some 39 million rolls.

GREENE: Which sounds like a lot. I guess the risk, Renee is, you know, if the government does this, they bring in too much toilet paper and people can start TP'ing the presidential palace or something.

MONTAGNE: Something like that.

GREENE: That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

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