9-Year-Old Girl Chastises McDonald's CEO

At the McDonald's annual shareholders meeting in Chicago Thursday, Hannah Robertson told CEO Don Thompson, "It would be nice if you stopped trying to trick kids into wanting to eat your food all the time." Hannah and her mother were part of a contingent from a watchdog group.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our Last Word in Business today - quite a tongue lashing for McDonald's. The company held its annual shareholders' meeting yesterday. And when the floor opened for questions, a 9-year-old girl approached the microphone.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Hannah Robertson spoke loud and clear, saying, quote, "There are things in life that aren't fair, like when your pet dies." And she continued, "I don't think it's fair when big companies try to trick kids into eating food."

GREENE: Robertson's mom is a nutritional activist who's been trying to get Mickey D's to stop marketing to kids. And yes, her criticism extends even to the company's mascot - Ronald.

MONTAGNE: McDonald's CEO Don Thompson called 9-year-old Hannah brave and separately said, Ronald is not a bad guy.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

GREENE: And I'm David Greene.

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