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Spelling Bee Winner Conquers 'German Curse'

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Spelling Bee Winner Conquers 'German Curse'

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Spelling Bee Winner Conquers 'German Curse'

Spelling Bee Winner Conquers 'German Curse'

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Arvind Mahankali, a 13-year-old from Bayside, N.Y., won the Scripps National Spelling Bee on Thursday after correctly spelling "knaidel." It's a yiddish term of German origin meaning "dumpling." Mahankali had stumbled on German words two years in a row. This year, he said, "the German curse has turned into in a German blessing."

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A 13-year-old from Queens won the Scripps National Spelling Bee last night. He correctly spelled a Yiddish word of German origin meaning dumpling.

(SOUNDBITE OF SCRIPPS NATIONAL SPELLING BEE)

ARVIND MAHANKALI: Knaidel. K-N-A-I-D-E-L. Knaidel.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: You are correct.

MONTAGNE: Arvind Mahankali had stumbled on German words in previous years. This year, he said, the German curse has turned into in a German blessing. It's MORNING EDITION.

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