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Chrysler Refuses To Recall Nearly 3 Million Vehicles

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Chrysler Refuses To Recall Nearly 3 Million Vehicles

Business

Chrysler Refuses To Recall Nearly 3 Million Vehicles

Chrysler Refuses To Recall Nearly 3 Million Vehicles

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Detroit automaker Chrysler is taking the rare step of defying the government by not recalling some 2.7 million of its vehicles. Federal safety officials say some Jeep Grand Cherokees and Jeep Liberties are dangerous and should be taken off the road. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says rear-mounted gas tanks in those vehicles are vulnerable to leaking and catching fire in rear-end collisions.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with a big no from Chrysler.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: The Detroit automaker is taking the unusual step of defying the government by refusing to recall some 2.7 million of its vehicles. Federal safety officials say 1993 to 2004 Jeep Grand Cherokees and the 2002 to 2007 Jeep Liberties are dangerous and should be taken off the road. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says rear-mounted gas tanks in those vehicles are vulnerable to leaking and catching fire in rear-end collisions.

Government statistics show more than 50 people have died in these vehicles as a result of such collisions. Chrysler says that analysis is faulty and its vehicles are safe, leading industry observers to believe that this is probably headed to court.

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