NPR logo

U.S. Navy To Auction 2 Vintage Landing Craft

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/193762875/193764215" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
U.S. Navy To Auction 2 Vintage Landing Craft

Business

U.S. Navy To Auction 2 Vintage Landing Craft

U.S. Navy To Auction 2 Vintage Landing Craft

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/193762875/193764215" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Vietnam War era vessels are each 74 feet long, can hold up to 200 people and can carry a tank, if you have happen to own one. These boats were familiar sights during the Vietnam war, when they patrolled rivers and deltas and carried supplies.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It may cost you more and more to fuel it, but this is still your chance to buy a vintage boat. Today's last word in business is your own personal D- Day.

The U.S. Navy is auctioning off two vintage landing craft. They are available on GovLiquidation.com - which is a real website, we checked.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Mm. The Vietnam War era vessels are each 74 feet long, each can hold up to 200 people, they can also carry a tank, if you have happen to own one. These boats were familiar sights during the Vietnam War, when they patrolled rivers and deltas and carried supplies.

INSKEEP: Now buyer beware, these boats have not been running for a few years due to some problems with the coolant systems, but the sellers say they can be fixed and run. Bidding for each boat has already topped $20,000 and bidding ends this afternoon.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

INSKEEP: Get your tank ready, Renee.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Copyright © 2013 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.