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Delta Airlines Fined For The Way It Bumps Passengers
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Delta Airlines Fined For The Way It Bumps Passengers

Business

Delta Airlines Fined For The Way It Bumps Passengers

Delta Airlines Fined For The Way It Bumps Passengers
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Like most airlines, Delta overbooks its flights. The Department of Transportation fined Delta $750,00 for violating rules on overbooking — specifically for complaints that it bumped passengers without first asking for volunteers, and also failed to offer compensation for those who got bumped.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: Bumped.

Yesterday, we told you about Delta Airlines CEO Richard Anderson. He gave up his seat on a flight to a woman desperately trying to get to Atlanta to pick up her daughter.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And to pick up her daughter from camp. It was a heartwarming story. But at its root is the reality that Delta - like most airlines - overbooks its flights. And yesterday, the Department of Transportation fined Delta $750,000 for violating rules on overbooking - specifically for complaints that it bumped passengers without first asking for volunteers, and also failed to offer compensation for those who got bumped.

GREENE: Now, a Delta spokesman called the complaints isolated incidents, but the Department of Transportation said there was quote, "a widespread practice of noncompliance."

I really think the message here is that, if you're on a crowded Delta flight, just have your eye out for the CEO at the gate.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

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