Connecticut Fights With North Carolina Over First In Flight

Anyone who's seen a North Carolina license plate knows the state proudly claims itself as the site of the first airplane flight. But this week, Connecticut said not so fast. The state passed a law declaring it was home to the first flight.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And that brings us to today's last word in business. It's a tongue twister: First in-flight fight.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

All right. Anyone who's seen a North Carolina license plate knows the state proudly claims itself as the site of the first airplane flight. But this week, Connecticut said not so fast. The state passed a law declaring it was home to the first flight.

GREENE: Connecticut Governor Dan Malloy says photographic evidence proves that the German immigrant and Bridgeport resident Gustave Whitehead beat the Wright Brothers into the air by two years. Of course, there does not appear to be a whole lot of support for this theory outside Connecticut.

MONTAGNE: Except maybe in his homeland - Germany - where the town where he was born now is pushing to name the local airport after him.

GREENE: You know, Renee, my wife says that Ohio is actually - deserves the credit for this, because the Wright Brothers - one of them was from Ohio, both of them lived there for a while - I don't know how this will end.

(LAUGHTER)

MONTAGNE: Good for competition.

GREENE: That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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