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'Dancing In The Street' To The World's Most Hated Band

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'Dancing In The Street' To The World's Most Hated Band

'Dancing In The Street' To The World's Most Hated Band

'Dancing In The Street' To The World's Most Hated Band

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/199802040/199809069" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In November 1964, Betty Kelly, Martha Reeves and Rosalind Ashford (aka Martha Reeves and the Vandellas) were at the top of the charts with their hit "Dancing in the Street." AP hide caption

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AP

In November 1964, Betty Kelly, Martha Reeves and Rosalind Ashford (aka Martha Reeves and the Vandellas) were at the top of the charts with their hit "Dancing in the Street."

AP

On this episode of the podcast edition of Weekends on All Things Considered- how "Dancing In The Street" defined a generation's protest culture, Johnny Depp at the cosmetics counter, and the divisive music of Phish and Insane Clown Posse.