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Meat Industry Files Suit Over USDA's Labeling

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Meat Industry Files Suit Over USDA's Labeling

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Meat Industry Files Suit Over USDA's Labeling

Meat Industry Files Suit Over USDA's Labeling

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The new meat labels went into effect in May. They require labels for meat to list where the animals were grown, raised and slaughtered. Before, only the country of origin had to be on the package.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And whether cattle was born in Montana or Manitoba, beef is beef. That's the message the meat industry is sending the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Groups, including Cattle and Pork Associations have filed a lawsuit against the USDA over new rules for meat labels.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

These rules went into effect in May. They require labels for meat, including steaks and ribs to list where animals were grown, raised and slaughtered. Before, only the country of origin had to be on the package.

MONTAGNE: The USDA maintains more information allows people to make more informed choices on the food they buy. The industry groups argue that the new labels don't provide a public health benefit. They're also complaining that the new labeling costs too much.

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