Where Do Mental Illness And Creativity Meet?

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"Everyone is just a little bit mad. How much depends on where you fall in the spectrum. How much depends on how lucky you are." — Joshua Walters i i

hide caption"Everyone is just a little bit mad. How much depends on where you fall in the spectrum. How much depends on how lucky you are." — Joshua Walters

James Duncan Davidson/TED
"Everyone is just a little bit mad. How much depends on where you fall in the spectrum. How much depends on how lucky you are." — Joshua Walters

"Everyone is just a little bit mad. How much depends on where you fall in the spectrum. How much depends on how lucky you are." — Joshua Walters

James Duncan Davidson/TED

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Unquiet Mind.

About Joshua Walters' TED Talk

Comedian Joshua Walters, who's bipolar, walks the line between mental illness and mental "skillness." He asks: What's the right balance between medicating craziness away, and riding the manic edge of creativity and drive?

About Joshua Walters

Walters is a comedian, poet, educator and performer, whose work explores language, creativity, beatboxing and madness. He incorporates elements of spoken word and beatbox into his shows in a mashup of comedy, intimate reflection and unpredictable antics. In the past two years, Walters has performed in theaters and universities throughout North America, Europe and the Middle East. His eclectic combination of performance disciplines and his activity as an educator in mental health have given him a national platform and audience. In 2002, he co-founded the Depression Bipolar Support Alliance Young Adults chapter in San Francisco, one of the few support groups in the country that's specifically for mentally ill young adults. As a facilitator, Walters developed humor to address the subject of mental illness, reframing it as a positive. Walters speaks as a mental health educator, and has engaged in mental health advocacy at conventions and in classrooms nationwide.

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