Jane Austen To Grace Britain's 10-Pound Note

The Bank of England has announced that famed novelist Jane Austen will be the next face on Britain's 10-pound note. Banknotes are redesigned fairly often there as a security measure. This spring there was also a major campaign to have better female representation on U.K. currency.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today puts the sense in sense in sensibility - 10 pounds worth of sense, or pence, to be precise.

The Bank of England just announced that novelist Jane Austen, the famed 18th-century novelist, will be the next face on Britain's 10-pound note.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And we should say banknotes are redesigned fairly often there as a security measure and to prevent forgeries. And this spring, there was also a major campaign to have better female representation on U.K. currency. Right now, when Britain's pay cash Renee, they, of course, see Queen Elizabeth as well as faces, including philosopher Adam Smith and Charles Darwin. And Darwin, by 2017, will be the one replaced by Jane Austen on the 10.

MONTAGNE: And David, really, what could Darwin say about that? Well, maybe, what? Survival of the fittest?

GREENE: Yeah, perfect. Perfect.

(LAUGHTER)

MONTAGNE: That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

GREENE: And I'm David Greene.

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