'Cronut' Often Imitated, But Can It Be Duplicated?

The cronut — a hybrid of a croissant and doughnut — was invented at the Dominique Ansel Bakery in Manhattan. Now, it's inspiring imitators. The doughnut with flaky layers is being made around the world from Japan to Australia and the U.K. Even Dunkin' Donuts is getting into the game. The news site Quartz reports that in South Korea, Dunkin' is offering a version it's calling "New York Pie Donuts."

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is a new fried dough craze.

It's the cronut. It's a hybrid of a croissant and doughnut. It was invented at the Dominique Ansel Bakery in Manhattan. And, Renee, I'm in Washington, and have not come across one of these yet.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I haven't tasted one out here in California, either. But in New York, at least, people have been waiting for hours to get their hands on the pastry. And the bakery has filed to trademark the cronut name.

GREENE: That is not stopping imitators. The doughnut with flaky layers is being made around the world, from Japan to Australia and the United Kingdom.

MONTAGNE: Even doughnut chain Dunkin' Donuts is getting in on the game. The news site Quartz reports that in South Korea, Dunkin' is now offering a version they're calling New York Pie Donuts.

GREENE: And the lines have apparently been long for those. There's even been talk of limiting to just two pastries per person.

MONTAGNE: But so far, you can't get cronuts at chains in the U.S. Imitations are available in some cities.

GREENE: Frankly, after all this talk, my coffee is just so lonely, I would be thrilled with just any old doughnut.

MONTAGNE: A nice doughnut, yeah.

Yeah, exactly. That's the business news from MORNING EDITION, on NPR News. I'm a very hungry David Greene.

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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