Team Walks Florida's Beaches With Google Eye

Google Street View cars have been photographing roads and highways for years, but how about this: Google Beach View. Florida is paying a pair of intrepid trekkers to walk all 825 miles of the state's beachfront carrying the Google Eye camera in a 40 pound backpack — blue orb sticking out the top.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business is: Paycheck for day at the beach.

Google Street View cars have been photographing roads and highways for years now, but how about this: Google Beach View. The state of Florida is paying a pair of intrepid trekkers to walk all 825 miles of the state's beachfront carrying the Google Eye camera in a 40 pound backpack - the blue orb is sticking out the top. And it's one way to turn heads at the beach.

Florida's tourism agency is paying $126,000 for the project. Small change, really, for a state that brought in $72 billion tourism dollars last year. It's an even better deal for Google, who only have to pay $1,000 for all of the photos. And not too bad a deal for the photographers; they are getting paid $27 a mile. Getting a good workout under the sun.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

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