Math Class: Oreo's Double Stuf Doesn't Measure Up

According to Dan Anderson's math class in Queensbury, N.Y., the Double Stuf Oreo is not quite double the size of the regular chocolate and cream version of the cookie. It's actually just 1.86 the size. He said the students were surprised with the result.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is a bit of confectionery math: one plus one equals 1.86.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Now you may remember the minor scandal that was kicked up when it was proved that Subway's foot-long sandwiches were actually less than a foot long.

GREENE: Well, now it appears that Nabisco's Double Stuf Oreos are also not measuring up. According to a high school math class in Upstate New York, the Double Stuf Oreo is actually not quite double the size of the regular chocolate and cream version of the cookie. It's actually just 1.86 the size.

MONTAGNE: Not quite twice. Math teacher Dan Anderson of Queensbury, New York says he is always looking for hands-on activities for his students. So he broke his class into groups to do some measuring and weighing. He said the students were surprised at the result.

GREENE: Yeah. And so, too, was Nabisco, which insists its Double Stuf recipe does use double the cream. Which I guess means that at least the calories are adding up.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ONE IS THE LONELIEST NUMBER")

THREE DOG NIGHT: (Singing) One of the loneliest number that you'll ever do.

GREENE: And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ONE IS THE LONELIEST NUMBER")

THREE DOG NIGHT: (Singing) ...it's the loneliest number since the number one. No is the saddest experience you'll ever know...

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