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Mainstay In Picture Books Is Going Digital
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Mainstay In Picture Books Is Going Digital

Digital Life

Mainstay In Picture Books Is Going Digital

Mainstay In Picture Books Is Going Digital
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Later this month, some Dr. Seuss books will be released in e-book format for the first time. The president of Dr. Seuss Enterprises says the e-books will stay faithful to the classic print versions.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

I meant what I said, and I said what I meant; a tablet is faithful 100 percent. A mainstay in the world of picture books is going digital. Almost all of Dr. Seuss's best-selling children's books will be released as e-books this year, starting with 15 titles near the end of this month.

Digital picture books make up only a marginal portion of total e-book sales, a number that could increase with the help of Dr. Seuss titles. Yes, you too can curl up with your 2-year-old and your tablet. The first books to be released include "The Cat in the Hat," "Green Eggs and Ham," and "There's a Wocket in My Pocket!"

The president of Dr. Seuss Enterprises says the e-books will stay faithful to the classic print versions.

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