World's Largest Ferris Wheel Will Be In Las Vegas

Las Vegas is adding an eye-catching tourist attraction, in the form of a huge wheel that can take more than 1,000 people on a ride 550 feet into the sky over the city's famed Strip. The main construction of the wheel, called the High Roller, is nearly finished; it is expected to open in early 2014.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Today's last word in business is: high roller.

It's the name of a new Ferris wheel being built in Las Vegas.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Vegas, baby. The big wheel will be the largest in the world when it's finished next year - 550 feet tall? That's nine feet taller than its competitor - the Singapore Flyer, and 100 feet taller than the London Eye.

MONTAGNE: The enclosed cabin - thank goodness they're enclosed - will hold up to 40 people each. And a single rotation will take about 30 minutes. Riders won't be allowed to smoke or eat on the ride, but they will be invited to bring a cocktail on board.

INSKEEP: Of course.

MONTAGNE: It's Las Vegas.

INSKEEP: And while the giant Ferris wheel will be visible all over Sin City, whatever happens at the top of the Ferris wheel stays there.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

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