Police Impersonators Jump Line To Buy 'Grand Theft Auto V'

Three New York men were so eager to get the game; they hatched a scheme that could be one of its plots. According to the New York Post, the men pulled up to a mall in an unmarked vehicle, walked past hundreds of people in line and purchased the game. Real police pulled them over after they ran multiple stop signs trying to get away.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is about three guys who could use a lawyer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The wildly popular video game "Grand Theft Auto" released a new installment this week, number five in the series. And three New York men were so eager to get the game; they hatched a scheme that could be one of "Grand Theft Auto's" plots.

According to the New York Post, the men pulled up to the Staten Island mall yesterday in a used police car they bought at auction, complete with lights and a siren. They walked past hundreds of people in line and flashed what looked like a police badge to get into the store.

INSKEEP: The men then purchased the game and attempted to get away. But they must have been nervous because real police pulled them over for running stop signs.

MONTAGNE: The three men were charged with criminal impersonation, which carries up to a year in jail.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

INSKEEP: I'm Steve Inskeep.

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