Celebrity Secret...Words

Celebrities have many secrets. Did you know Clint Eastwood is secretly addicted to hot beverages? Host Ophira Eisenberg asks contestants to find the secret words hidden in celebrities' names, like the "teas" in ClinT EAStwood.

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Moving on, here are our next two contestants: Margaret Maloney and Eric Schulmiller. Happy to have you.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Now, you are a cantor at a synagogue, awmane.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: And you have Schul in your name.

ERIC SCHULMILLER: That's actually thanks to my wife. We actually combined our names when we got married. I was Miller and she was Schulman, and we just shared.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Oh, that is so adorable. Now your trivia roots run deep, right? Three generations of trivia winners? You have some winners. Your father was a winner on...

SCHULMILLER: Yeah, my father was on the old "Sale of the Century" back in the early 70s, and he won my bedroom furniture and a trip to Acapulco.

(LAUGHTER)

STEVE SPINOGLIO: And a sailboat, which he couldn't use in his Brooklyn apartment, so he had to...

EISENBERG: So he had to just set it out on the Gowanus.

SPINOGLIO: Yeah, before eBay, I don't know what they did.

EISENBERG: And Margaret, you are a linguistic major at Harvard, but now pre-med.

MARGARET MALONEY: That's right.

EISENBERG: That is - me too.

MALONEY: Oh, my god.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: No. That's amazing. And your trivia roots run deep as well. High school...

MALONEY: Yes, I grew up in Alabama. And when I was in high school, I was on the Scholars Bowl team, and we were televised on public access television. It was very exciting. And I would go around town and every once in a while some random person that I didn't know would come up and say "I saw you on the television. That was so nice." And I'd be like, "Oh yes, thank you."

(LAUGHTER)

MALONEY: So, anyway...

EISENBERG: I feel like that even exchange just brought me right into Alabama.

MALONEY: Absolutely.

NOAH TARNOW: It was "the television."

EISENBERG: All right. So if we've learned anything from celebrity magazines, it's that stars are just like us. They have secrets too. But this game, we're talking about secret words hidden in the middle of celebrities' names.

For example, if I said, the Oscar-winning director whose recent claim to fame is talking to an empty chair, is hiding several herbal beverages, what are they? You would say "Clint Eastwood's teas." Right, so easy, because the word "teas" is embedded in his name. The "t" in Clint and the "e-a-s" in Eastwood.

TARNOW: The sound of comprehension.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Pretty sneaky, right?

MALONEY: It sounds great.

SCHULMILLER: Got it.

EISENBERG: Excellent. So I'm going to give you the clues to celebrities and the words they are hiding. You need to ring in when you can name the celebrity and the hidden word. Just like I did, "Clint Eastwood's teas." So here we go. The lead singer of Aerosmith is hiding an air duct. What I it?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Eric?

SCHULMILLER: Tyler's vents. I'm drawing a blank on the first name.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: All right.

SCHULMILLER: Steven Tyler's vents.

EISENBERG: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Wonderful.

SCHULMILLER: He wrote Penny Lane, I think.

EISENBERG: He wrote Penny Lane, that's right.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: The beautiful but deadly star of "Kill Bill" is hiding a system of numbers and spatial relationships. What is it?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Margaret?

MALONEY: Uma Thurman's math.

EISENBERG: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: The star of "The Help," who recently played Gwen Stacy in "The Amazing Spider-Man" is hiding the support for a boat's sail. What is it?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Margaret?

MALONEY: Emma Stone's mast.

EISENBERG: Yes, it is.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: The singer of "Superstition" and "I Just Called to say I Love You" is hiding a certain belief or way of thinking. What is it?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Eric?

SCHULMILLER: Stevie Wonder's views.

EISENBERG: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: The star of "Escape from New York" and long time partner of Goldie Hawn is hiding the supportive framework for a bridge.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Margaret?

MALONEY: Kurt Russell's truss.

EISENBERG: That's correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: The tiny Tony Award winner who appeared in the musical "Wicked" and on "Glee" and "The Good Wife" is hiding a unit of measurement.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Eric?

SCHULMILLER: Kristin Chenoweth's width.

EISENBERG: No.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Margaret?

MALONEY: Kristin Chenoweth's inch.

EISENBERG: That's correct, yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: The woman who's making an empire out of making good things for entertaining and homemaking is hiding a need for speed. What is it?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Margaret?

MALONEY: This is wrong, but Martha Stewart's wart.

(LAUGHTER)

TARNOW: You're right, that is wrong, for so many reasons.

EISENBERG: Yeah, that is incorrect. I like that you associated a wart with the need for speed. To get it lanced off, I suppose.

SCHULMILLER: I just had to share that one. I couldn't keep that one to myself.

EISENBERG: You liked the idea of just picturing her with a wart, I know. I know, heads would roll. Heads would roll. Eric, any...

SCHULMILLER: Still not getting it.

EISENBERG: Still not getting it. Let's throw it out there. Anyone know.

(SOUNDBITE OF AUDIENCE YELLING)

EISENBERG: Martha Stewart's haste. Yes, that was very, very challenging. Well done, audience. Well done, contestants.

TARNOW: Yes, Margaret is the winner.

EISENBERG: Margaret, well done.

(APPLAUSE)

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