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Moms Sell Healthy Lunches For Kids At School

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Moms Sell Healthy Lunches For Kids At School

Business

Moms Sell Healthy Lunches For Kids At School

Moms Sell Healthy Lunches For Kids At School

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/225303954/225304059" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Stephanie Rubin and Ingrid Calvo are two New York-based moms who think American school lunches leave a lot to be desired. So they started a delivery business in Manhattan called Inboxyourmeal com. For $10, they'll deliver healthy, chef-prepared meals to students in their delivery area.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And for today's last word in business, let's hear of two women who are concerned about weight gain - at least amongst school children.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Stephanie Rubin and Ingrid Calvo are two New York-based moms who are not fans of American school lunches. So they started a delivery business in Manhattan called Inboxyourmeal com.

GREENE: For $10, they will deliver healthy, chef-prepared meals to your kid at school. Think teriyaki, turkey burgers, creamy potatoes with fresh herbs and those very healthy strawberries dipped in fudge.

INSKEEP: All of which your kid can then trade for a proper Twinkie or some Doritos.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

GREENE: And I'm David Greene.

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