Ellison Skips Out On Keynote Address At Oracle Conference

Larry Ellison — the billionaire CEO of Oracle — was scheduled to deliver a keynote address on Tuesday at Oracle OpenWorld. Thousands showed up or tuned in remotely, but the nation's third-richest man didn't show up. Instead, he was watching Oracle Team USA in the America's Cup.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now our last word in business today is playing hooky. Larry Ellison - the billionaire CEO of Oracle - was scheduled to deliver a keynote address yesterday at the Oracle OpenWorld Conference. Thousands showed up or tuned in remotely, but the nation's third-richest man was a no-show.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

That's right. Forty-five minutes after his address was supposed to start, the company's chairman finally got on stage to break the bad news. He said there's been quote, a great deal of fluidity in our scheduling.

INSKEEP: Something was fluid. Maybe the water in the ocean, because the multibillion-dollar businessman was instead on a boat, just a few miles away in San Francisco Harbor, watching the America's Cup sailing race. And what a race. Ellison's Oracle Team USA came from behind to tie the series eight-to-eight. The final matchup is scheduled for this afternoon.

GREENE: Some conference attendees were none too happy.

INSKEEP: But sports fans may be more forgiving. If Oracle Team USA wins the trophy, the victory will cap one of the greatest comebacks in sports history. It's doubtful that Larry Ellison is going to skip out of that presentation.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

GREENE: And I'm David Greene.

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