What Listening To Nature Teaches Us About Changing Habitats

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"In habitats that are pretty much untouched, the sound is organized and structured in such a way so that each critter establishes its own bandwidth" — Bernie Kraus i i

hide caption"In habitats that are pretty much untouched, the sound is organized and structured in such a way so that each critter establishes its own bandwidth" — Bernie Kraus

James Duncan Davidson/TED
"In habitats that are pretty much untouched, the sound is organized and structured in such a way so that each critter establishes its own bandwidth" — Bernie Kraus

"In habitats that are pretty much untouched, the sound is organized and structured in such a way so that each critter establishes its own bandwidth" — Bernie Kraus

James Duncan Davidson/TED

Part 3 in the TED Radio Hour episode "Everything Is Connected."

About Bernie Krause's TEDTalk

Bernie Krause has been recording the wild — the wind in the trees, the chirping of birds — for 45 years. He has seen many environments radically altered by humans, sometimes even by practices thought to be environmentally safe.

About Bernie Krause

Bernie Krause is a bioacoustician whose recordings have uncovered nature's rich sonic tapestry — along with some unexpected results. Krause captures the fading voices of nature, studying sonic interplay between species as they attract mates, hunt prey and sound out their roles in the ecosystem. His documentation of vanishing aural habitats is a chilling reminder of shrinking biodiversity. Krause is also known for his music career, working with artists such as The Byrds and Stevie Wonder. He's the author of the book The Great Animal Orchestra.

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