Millions Of TV Viewers Say Goodbye To 'Breaking Bad'

The audience numbers aren't out yet, but viewership for the very last episode of AMC's Breaking Bad was expected to top 8 million Sunday night. Thirty second ad slots reportedly sold for $250,000, and a promise to buy more ads on other shows.

Copyright © 2013 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is the last word in "Breaking Bad."

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

That's right. Millions of viewers tuned in last night to the dramatic series finale on AMC. No spoilers here, for the record.

GREENE: The numbers are not out yet, but viewership for the very last episode of "Breaking Bad" was expected to top eight million last night. Thirty-second ad slots reportedly sold for $250,000, and a promise to buy more ads on other shows.

INSKEEP: Businesses are also cashing in New Mexico where the series has been set. A local candy store this year alone sold 35,000 bags of blue rock candy that looks awful lot like Walter White's blue meth.

GREENE: That's amazing. That is the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

So David, the episode last night was unbelievable. The part where Walter White...

GREENE: Yeah. Oh wait, our mics are still open, Steve.

INSKEEP: Oh. OK.

GREENE: No, no spoilers. Yeah.

Copyright © 2013 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: