Send Us Your Government Shutdown Questions

Should the federal government shutdown continue for several more days, we're sure you'll have specific questions about how the government is working — or not working. Perhaps you're a federal worker, or maybe you rely on a government service. We want to know how the shutdown is affecting you and what you're worried about, or if you've been effected by past shutdowns and have wisdom to share. We could use a little free wisdom here in Washington. Click here to tell us your shutdown story , select "All Things Considered" in the drop down, and put "Shutdown Question" in your subject line.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

As the shutdown continues, we're sure you'll have specific questions about how the government is working or not.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Perhaps you're a federal worker, maybe you rely on a government service. We want to know how the shutdown is affecting you and what you're worried about.

BLOCK: Or if you've been affected by past shutdowns and have wisdom to share, feel free.

CORNISH: 'Cause, frankly, we could use a little free wisdom here in Washington. Send us your wisdom and questions at NPR.org. Look for Contact at the very bottom of the page. Select ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. And please put Shutdown Question in your subject line.

BLOCK: You can also send us a tweet. We are @npratc. We'll see if we can get some answers for you later this week.

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