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Measure To Fix 'Pint-Size' Problem In Michigan

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Measure To Fix 'Pint-Size' Problem In Michigan

Business

Measure To Fix 'Pint-Size' Problem In Michigan

Measure To Fix 'Pint-Size' Problem In Michigan

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/230356309/230356296" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A bill introduced in Michigan would require pints of beer to be actual pints of beer — that is a full 16 ounces. Lawmakers there have been crying in their beers saying that many bars sell beer by the pint, even though the glasses hold only 12 to 14 ounces.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is pint-sized.

A bill introduced in Michigan would require that pints of beer be actual pints of beer - that is a full 16 ounces.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Lawmakers there have been crying in their beers saying that many bars sell beer by the pint, even though the glasses hold only 12 to 14 ounces. State representatives sponsoring the bill say they're simply seeking truth in advertising, which has left opponents crying in their beers. Come on, they say, the term pint is used generically. And business owners complained that they'll have to replace glassware that doesn't measure up.

INSKEEP: Although, there is another option: stop using the word pint when selling beer.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

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