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No Bones About It, Shutdown Traps T. Rex In Storage Facility

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No Bones About It, Shutdown Traps T. Rex In Storage Facility

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No Bones About It, Shutdown Traps T. Rex In Storage Facility

No Bones About It, Shutdown Traps T. Rex In Storage Facility

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A tyrannosaurus rex skeleton, one of the most complete in existence, was to head to the Smithsonian Natural History Museum this week. But with the museum closed because of the partial government shutdown, the T. rex will stay in Montana until spring.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

It may have been a fearsome predator in its day, but even Tyrannosaurus rex could not escape the government shutdown. A T. rex skeleton, one of the most complete in existence, was headed to the Smithsonian's Natural History Museum this week to star in the National Fossil Day festivities. But with the museum closed, the tyrant lizard will continue to reign supreme at a storage facility in Montana, coming to Washington next spring

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