Ikea's Chinese Stores Invite Nappers To Try Out Their Beds

So many customers have been napping on the beds in Ikea's Chinese stores that employees have begun to change the sheets daily. One store in Hong Kong invited its customers to wear their pajamas and sleep over. About 80 of them did.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Today's last word in business is: Sleep on it.

Customers in China's Ikea stores are taking that common advice about making shopping decisions and not making any fast decisions quite literally.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

So many customers have been napping on the beds in the furniture company's Chinese stores that employees have begun to change the sheets daily, like a hotel. That's one part of Ikea's welcoming approach to the napping.

MONTAGNE: One store in Hong Kong even invited its customers to wear their pajamas and sleep over. And around 80 of them did.

INSKEEP: A spokesperson explained the decision saying, today's visitors could be tomorrow's clients - unless they just move in.

(LAUGHTER)

INSKEEP: That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

MONTAGNE: There's lots of furniture there.

INSKEEP: Sure, why not, you know?

MONTAGNE: Lots of drawers.

INSKEEP: Probably close to a restaurant. It's just fine. Go over to the kitchen section and clean up. I'm Steve Inskeep.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

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