State Dollars Reopen Federal Landmarks

When the government shut down, National Parks were closed. Now states are using their own money to open such treasures as Mount Rushmore, the Grand Canyon and the Statue of Liberty.

Copyright © 2013 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Though much of the government remains closed, Mount Rushmore reopens today. South Dakota worked out a deal with the National Park Service. The state will pay more than $15,000 a day - all the costs of running the park.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The Argus Leader newspaper reports the state, in turn, is getting money from private donors. Other national parks have already re-opened as states pay the costs, without a guarantee of federal repayment.

The Statue of Liberty opened yesterday in New York. The Grand Canyon reopened Saturday in Arizona.

GREENE: And now the giant sculpture of four presidents on a mountainside can be seen by tourists. It has been closed since October 1st. Now we cannot confirm rumors that, during the past two weeks, while out of sight, Abe Lincoln yanked his beard in frustration, Theodore Roosevelt threw his glasses, George Washington cursed, and Thomas Jefferson hung his head in shame.

INSKEEP: By the time tourists arrive the four presidents will be in their customary poses, calm and confident, eyes always fixed on the horizon.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "GOD BLESS AMERICA")

Copyright © 2013 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.