Is 'Patient Capitalism' The Answer To Poverty?

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Jacqueline Novogratz, CEO of Acumen i i

Jacqueline Novogratz, CEO of Acumen Joyce David/Courtesy of Acumen hide caption

itoggle caption Joyce David/Courtesy of Acumen
Jacqueline Novogratz, CEO of Acumen

Jacqueline Novogratz, CEO of Acumen

Joyce David/Courtesy of Acumen

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Haves And Have-Nots.

About Jacqueline Novogratz's TEDTalk

Jacqueline Novogratz, CEO of Acumen Fund, shares stories of how "patient capitalism" can bring sustainable jobs, goods, services and dignity to the world's poor.

About Jacqueline Novogratz

Jacqueline Novogratz is redefining the way problems of poverty can be solved around the world.

She is a leading proponent of financing enterprises that can bring affordable clean water, housing and health care to poor people so that they no longer depend on traditional charity and aid.

The Acumen Fund, which she founded in 2001, has an ambitious plan: to create a blueprint for alleviating poverty using market-oriented approaches.

Rather than handing out grants, Acumen invests in fledgling companies and organizations that bring products and services to the world's poor.

Novogratz places a great deal of importance on identifying solutions from within communities rather than imposing them from the outside.

In her book, The Blue Sweater, she tells stories which emphasize sustainable bottom-up solutions over traditional top-down aid.

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