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At Walt Disney World, Mickey Breaks His Silence

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At Walt Disney World, Mickey Breaks His Silence

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At Walt Disney World, Mickey Breaks His Silence

At Walt Disney World, Mickey Breaks His Silence

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Walt Disney World in Orlando announced this week that after four decades of awkward silence, Mickey Mouse is now talking to visitors. Mickey hasn't spoken individually to guests at Orlando's Magic Kingdom since it opened in 1971.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: talking mouse.

Walt Disney World in Orlando announced this week that after four decades of silence - pretty awkward silence - Mickey Mouse is now talking to visitors.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MICKEY MOUSE: No way. You're here. Well, hi, there. Come on over.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Disney posted a video of Mickey greeting visitors with stock phrases like the one you just heard, as well as: Can I sign that for you?

GREENE: Of Mickey does speak in movies and on TV, and even during park's stage shows, but hasn't spoken individually to guests at Orlando's Magic Kingdom since it opened in 1971.

INSKEEP: The move comes as Disney's U.S. theme park set attendance records in the latest fiscal quarter, mostly due to a 7 percent jump in international travelers with tourists from Brazil leading the charge

GREENE: Seems Mickey's next trick might be to learn some phrases in Portuguese.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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