How To Jazz Up Your Diving Course? Add A Zombie Apocalypse

Woody Tinslow combined his enthusiasms for diving and zombies to create America's first-ever Zombie Apocalypse Diver course. You can get scuba-certified while being chased by zombie divers. The Connecticut course has been so popular it has spawned imitations in Hawaii, Kentucky, Arizona and Guam.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On this first day of November, Day of the Dead celebrations get underway - which brings us to our Last Word In Business: zombies.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Woody Tinslow, master diving instructor and zombie fan, has combined those enthusiasms to create America's first-ever Zombie Apocalypse Diving Course.

INSKEEP: Yes. You, too, can get scuba-certified while being chased by zombie divers through hoops with dangling zombie body parts.

MONTAGNE: The Connecticut course has been so popular it spawned imitations in Hawaii, Kentucky, Arizona and even Guam.

INSKEEP: Explaining his unusual success, Mr. Tinslow says, zombies entice a younger crowd. Renee, we have to say this the proper way. (Zombie voice) nbuMonotone voice) : That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

MONTAGNE: (Zombie voice) And I'm Renee Montagne.

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