Job Applicants Find Position Titles Confusing

One of the many challenges in finding the right job these days can be just figuring out what recruiters are actually offering. A website compiled a list of the most ridiculous job titles, after a number of applicants complained that they didn't understand what the positions entailed. You can't blame them for being confused. A paper boy is now a "media distribution officer."

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our Last Word In Business today is jobbledygook. One of the many challenges in finding the right job these days, turns out, can be just figuring out what recruiters are actually offering.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The website MyJobMatcher.com compiled a list of the most ridiculous job titles after a number of applicants complained that they didn't understand what the positions entailed.

GREENE: And who can blame people for being confused? A paper boy is now a, quote, "media distribution officer."

MONTAGNE: A food truck worker is a mobile sustenance facilitator - I can't even say it.

(LAUGHTER)

GREENE: And how about the school lunch lady who is now, evidently, an education center nourishment consultant.

MONTAGNE: These jazzed-up job titles are supposed to make the work sound more appealing, but mostly they end up just bewildering potential candidates.

GREENE: Renee, I don't even want to think about what that makes us. Radio wave information providers?

MONTAGNE: Oh, sure.

GREENE: Yeah.

MONTAGNE: Why not?

GREENE: OK. Let's go with that. That's who we are. That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

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