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Uncollected Change At TSA Security Gates Adds Up

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Uncollected Change At TSA Security Gates Adds Up

Business

Uncollected Change At TSA Security Gates Adds Up

Uncollected Change At TSA Security Gates Adds Up

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/247297854/247297837" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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All those passengers going through security lines, and some of them leave their loose change behind. The Transportation Security Administration collected more than $500,00 in loose change last year. A House bill would require the money goes to a nonprofit.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

If you're in the right place in the right time, you could fund your company with spare change. Because our last word in business today is: Economy Class.

Imagine you're in an airport security line and realize you have loose change in your pocket.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

You know, you plop your coins into that little plastic bin, send it down the x-ray conveyor belt and maybe forget to pick up the change.

INSKEEP: Well, it turns out that uncollected change adds up. The Transportation Security Administration collected over half a million dollars in loose change last year.

GREENE: And a bill set to go before the House would require the TSA to set that money aside for nonprofits that provide airport services for members of the military and their families.

INSKEEP: An act of Thanksgiving at the end of the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

GREENE: And I'm David Greene.

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