An 'Accidental Activist,' And England's World Cup Hope

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest discoveries.

This week, Watson tells NPR's Arun Rath about about a rising star in soccer who could turn things around for England in the World Cup, and a Bahraini woman who calls herself an "accidental activist." He also shares a clip from an Ozy interview with President Bill Clinton regarding Nelson Mandela's legacy.

The New And The Next

  • The 'Accidental Activist'

    Maryam i i
    Susanna Ireland/Eyevine/Redux
    Maryam
    Susanna Ireland/Eyevine/Redux

    "Maryam al-Khawaja, a 26-year-old activist in Bahrain, calls herself, appropriately, 'the accidental activist.' While she grew up in a family of activists who'd been protesting for more freedom in that oil-rich country of about a million people, the reality is she actually tried to step away from it. ... And ultimately when her father was arrested, sister arrested, brother-in-law arrested — and not only arrested, but beaten — she found herself drawn to that work and try to stimulate a furtherance of the Arab Spring effort in Bahrain."

    Read 'Maryam Al-Khawaja, The Accidental Activist' At Ozy.com

  • England's World Cup Savior?

    ST ALBANS, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 10: John Ruddy looks on during the England training session at London Colney on October 10, 2013 in St Albans, England. (Photo by Michael Regan - The FA/The FA via Getty Images) i i
    Michael Regan/Getty Images
    ST ALBANS, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 10: John Ruddy looks on during the England training session at London Colney on October 10, 2013 in St Albans, England. (Photo by Michael Regan - The FA/The FA via Getty Images)
    Michael Regan/Getty Images

    "England hasn't won ... in almost 50 years, since 1966. Tons of heartbreak, including in the last World Cup in a match with the U.S. But now, here comes a strapping young fellow, 6'4", 210-pound goalie named John Ruddy, who was kind of an obscure guy — struggled his first big league opportunity there. But has come on recently, joined their national team and this time around is bucking, not only to become the starter on the national team, but perhaps their star."

    Read 'Football's Dark Horse' At Ozy.com

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