Leaked Documents Show Government Spying On Fantasy Games

A new leak from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden reveals that intelligence agencies spied on popular online fantasy games, like Second Life and World of Warcraft.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: spying on your Second Life.

We already know our personal lives aren't safe from NSA surveillance. Turns out, neither are our virtual lives.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A new leak from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden reveals that intelligence agencies spied on popular online fantasy games like "Second Life" and "World of Warcraft."

An NSA analyst writes, quote, "These games offer realistic weapons training." Like, say, how to cleave an orc with an ax.

MONTAGNE: Though the documents leaked show no signs of any counterterrorism successes resulting from these efforts, it did give the intelligence agents a good excuse to play, or at least listen in on some games at work.

INSKEEP: And not only that, anybody who was playing and being surveilled, they finally had an audience for what they were doing - somebody to watch their accomplishments, "World of Warcraft."

MONTAGNE: And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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