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Las Vegas Poker Player Reunited With Lost $300,000

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Las Vegas Poker Player Reunited With Lost $300,000

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Las Vegas Poker Player Reunited With Lost $300,000

Las Vegas Poker Player Reunited With Lost $300,000

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A taxi driver in Las Vegas first thought the brown bag on the backseat contained chocolate. As it turned out, it was filled with something even sweeter. Six thick bundles of $100 bills. The driver handed the bag in to his office which tracked down the passenger, a well-known poker player.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And that brings us to today's last word in business: cold, hard cash.

That's what a passenger left behind in a Las Vegas taxicab. The driver first thought the brown bag sitting on the back seat contained chocolate, but as it turned out, it was filled with something a lot sweeter. Six thick bundles of hundred-dollar bills, in total, 300,000 bucks. The driver handed the bag in to his office - the responsible thing to do. The office tracked down the amazingly absent-minded passenger, not surprisingly a well-known poker player. There was no immediate word on whether this unnamed high-roller gave the cabbie an extra Christmas tip or not.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

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