Chinese Military Uncovers Secret Tunnel

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The underground passageway goes from the city of Shenzhen to Hong Kong. It's outfitted with concrete walls, interior lighting and rail tracks, presumably intended to transport goods. Chinese authorities believe a gang intended to use the tunnel to smuggle cell phones and other electronics to Hong Kong — which has lower tariffs than the mainland.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And to today's last word in business is tunnel.

Come on, admit it. When you were a kid, you sat on the beach using those plastic shovels. You started digging and you said: I'm going to dig a tunnel all the way to China.

Well, the Chinese military on patrol recently uncovered a secret tunnel. OK, it doesn't run through the Earth's core. But this 130 foot underground passageway goes from the city of Shenzhen to Hong Kong. It's outfitted with concrete walls, interior lighting and rail tracks, presumably intended to transport goods.

Chinese authorities believe a gang intended to use the tunnel to smuggle cell phones and other electronics to Hong Kong - which has lower tariffs than on the mainland.

Whew. It's lucky the Chinese military never found that tunnel I dug as a kid on the beach in Margate, New Jersey. Shhh. Don't tell.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

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