Illinois Man Tries To Profit Off Fake 'Star Trek' Device

An Illinois man was accused of soliciting $25 million from investors for a fictitious device. Named after Dr. McCoy in the science-fiction series, it supposedly delivered medical data like the tricorder on the TV show. Prosecutors said his actions were valid only in another dimension.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Star Trek fans are passionate, but usually above the law. Trekkies go to conventions dressed like Spock or Captain Kirk. But Howard Leventhal tried to cash in on his fantasy life. The Illinois man solicited $25 million from investors for a fictitious device. Named after Dr. McCoy in the sci-fi series, it supposedly delivered medical data like the Star Trek's tricorder. Prosecutors said Leventhal's actions were valid only in another dimension. He pleaded guilty to fraud.

It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2013 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.