Japanese Vending Machines Sell Bras

In Japan, you can buy an incredible range of things from vending machines: bags of rice, fishing tackle or fresh flowers. And now you can add bras to that list — in particular the wireless "Fun Fun Week" bra.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Oh, that voice.

Today's last word in business is vending boundaries.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Japan, you can buy an incredible range of things from vending machines.

GREENE: Like bags of rice.

MONTAGNE: OK. Or fishing tackle...

GREENE: ...or fresh flowers.

MONTAGNE: And now you can add bras to that list - in particular the wireless "Fun Fun Week" bra.

A vending machine selling that brand was set up in a Tokyo mall last month. The bras are held in clear bags that give customers a peek at the colorful designs and patterns.

Which is aimed at enticing customers to buy one. They cost just under $30. But business has not been booming

GREENE: Japanese newspapers report that only seven browser bras in the past month.

MONTAGNE: Can't imagine why but...

(LAUGHTER)

MONTAGNE: But ultimately I think we can say fairly that this venture is a bust.

GREENE: No comment. Seems that way.

MONTAGNE: And that's the business news from MORNING EDITION on NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

GREENE: And I'm David Greene.

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