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Ice Cream Truck Switches From Jingles To Text Messages

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Ice Cream Truck Switches From Jingles To Text Messages

Europe

Ice Cream Truck Switches From Jingles To Text Messages

Ice Cream Truck Switches From Jingles To Text Messages

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Sweden's icy winter leads a lot of people indoors which didn't deter one enterprising ice cream truck driver. He simply played his truck's jingle louder. So loud, that residents complained. Which led the ice cream company to come up with a quieter substitute to the traditional jingle: texting.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. Sweden's icy winter keeps a lot of people indoors, so one enterprising ice cream truck driver took to playing his truck's jingle louder so residents could hear. So loud, in fact, that people complained. Which led the ice cream company to come up with a quieter substitute to the traditional jingle: texting. Though you have to wonder if the whoosh or the ding of a text really says ice cream coming your way, get ready. It's MORNING EDITION.

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