Movie Mogul Who Popularized Kung Fu Fighting Dies At 106

Pioneering Hong Kong movie producer Run Run Shaw has died. His studio popularized the kung fu genre that influenced Quentin Tarantino and other Hollywood directors. He was 106.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

If you have ever enjoyed an action-packed Kung Fu film, take a moment to thank Sir Run Run Shaw, who passed away today at age 106.

(SOUNDBITE OF FANFARE MUSIC)

GREENE: The television and movie mogul popularized the Kung Fu genre, opening Shaw Brothers film studio in Hong Kong, in his early 20s.

(SOUNDBITE OF A MOVIE TRAILER)

UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER: The new movie sensation that's stunning the world, a martial arts masterpiece...

GREENE: Shaw Brothers grew to be Asia's largest production studio by the late '50s, and also one of the most influential film companies in the world. They produced almost a thousand low-budget, action, kick-flicks, including "The Magnificent Concubine," "The One-Armed Swordsman" and also this film, "Five Fingers of Death."

(SOUNDBITE OF A MOVIE TRAILER)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: See mighty warriors attack each other with the most deadly weapons ever developed - their bare hands.

GREENE: Sir Run Run Shaw, knighted in 1977, went on to run one of the world's dominant Chinese-language television networks, launching careers of many Chinese film mega-stars.

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