World's Longest Mobility Scooter Has Room For Chauffeur

A British company has accomplished a Guinness record: the world's longest mobility scooter. That's those four wheelers many seniors use to get around. The Limobilizer is a three-seater — room for two passengers and a chauffeur. It features a mini bar, ice bucket and sound-system.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And our last word in business is: Limobilizer or maybe it's limo - bilizer.

There are many kinds of stretch limos on the road - stretch Cadillacs, stretch Hummers, stretch BMWs.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now you can add stretch mobility scooter to the list. A British company has just entered the Guinness Book of Records for the world's longest mobility scooter. These are the four-wheelers that many seniors use to get around.

INSKEEP: The Limobilizer is a three-seater - room for two passengers and a chauffeur. It features a mini bar, ice bucket and sound system.

GREENE: Of course, it does. It might be a little hard to maneuver when you're turning corners in a crowded store, but you do have the chauffeur for that. And given some running room, this thing can reach top speeds of four miles an hour.

INSKEEP: Woo.

GREENE: That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

INSKEEP: I'm Steve Inskeep.

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