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Retailers May Use Video Cameras To Track Shoppers

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Retailers May Use Video Cameras To Track Shoppers

Business

Retailers May Use Video Cameras To Track Shoppers

Retailers May Use Video Cameras To Track Shoppers

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/262946943/262946944" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Security tech company 3VR has unveiled an in-store video camera that allegedly uses facial recognition to gauge your age, gender and mood. Retailers could use real-time information to customize digital signs — just as you are passing.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And our last word in business is: Surveillance - not from the NSA, but from a store near you.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Retailers have long tracked activity in stores, with video cameras. Now, they have an option to track you. Security tech company 3VR has unveiled an in-store video camera that allegedly uses facial recognition to gauge your age, gender and mood.

INSKEEP: Retailers could use real-time information to customize digital signs - just as you are passing.

MONTAGNE: They might even warn a nearby sales associate of your facial expression as you head toward the counter.

INSKEEP: Maybe you're looking cranky, or maybe ready for an impulse buy.

MONTAGNE: No word, though, on how the software analyzes the guy in sunglasses, or a kid sticking out her tongue. And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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