Fresh Air Weekend: Roger Ailes, Rosanne Cash And Sonia Sotomayor

In addition to being the first Hispanic to serve on the Supreme Court, Sonia Sotomayor was New York state's first Hispanic federal judge. i i

In addition to being the first Hispanic to serve on the Supreme Court, Sonia Sotomayor was New York state's first Hispanic federal judge. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Kainaz Amaria/NPR
In addition to being the first Hispanic to serve on the Supreme Court, Sonia Sotomayor was New York state's first Hispanic federal judge.

In addition to being the first Hispanic to serve on the Supreme Court, Sonia Sotomayor was New York state's first Hispanic federal judge.

Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Book Chronicles The Building Of Roger Ailes' Fox News Empire: Gabriel Sherman traces the beginning of Fox News' success back to its wall-to-wall coverage of Monica Lewinsky. He says, "Ratings during the Lewinsky scandal exploded more than 400 percent, so you saw instantly that there was a market for this type of ... television." Sherman's book is called The Loudest Voice In The Room.

Rosanne Cash: Seeking A 'Thread' Through Southern History: Ken Tucker says The River & The Thread is a travelogue; a timeless work of comfort and quiet joy.

As A Latina, Sonia Sotomayor Says, 'You Have To Work Harder': The Supreme Court justice tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, "In every position that I've been in, there have been naysayers who don't believe I'm qualified or who don't believe I can do the work." She has committed herself to proving those people wrong.

You can listen to the original interviews here:

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