After Hibernation, Rosetta Seeks Its Stone

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The Rosetta spacecraft has awakened. It was put in hibernation for 31 months while its orbit took it nearly half a billion miles from the sun, too far for its solar arrays to keep the spacecraft operational. But now it's close enough, and European Space Agency mission managers will start preparing for Rosetta's rendezvous with a comet later this year.

Correction Jan. 22, 2014

The audio of this story, as was the case in a previous Web introduction, incorrectly says that the spacecraft's orbit was half a million miles from the sun. It's actually half a billion miles.

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