Denver, Seattle Museums Bet Art In The Name Of Football

If Seattle wins the Super Bowl, the Denver Art Museum hands over a Frederic Remington bronze of a cowboy on a bucking bronco. If Denver wins, the Seattle Art Museum gives up a six-paneled Japanese screen from 1902. The winner only gets to keep the other museum's artwork for three months.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Our last word in business is: a friendly wager.

Museums in Denver and Seattle bet art in the name of football. If Seattle wins the Super Bowl, the Denver Art Museum hands over a Frederic Remington bronze of a cowboy on a bucking bronco.

If Denver wins, the Seattle Art Museum gives up a six-paneled Japanese screen from 1902. Now the winner only gets to keep the other museum's artwork temporarily. But maybe museums can make a regular practice of doing this, permanently. You know, the director of the Louvre could walk around saying things like, the Mona Lisa is smiling because she knows it'll be the Broncos by three.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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