How A Halftime Show Wardrobe Malfunction Changed The Internet

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest feature stories.

This week, Watson talks with host Arun Rath about Super Bowl ads targeting female viewers, how Janet Jackson's infamous halftime show wardrobe malfunction 10 years ago influenced social media. They also discuss a company with an interesting toilet design aimed at saving water.

The New And The Next

  • 10 Years Since Janet Jackson's Wardrobe Malfunction

    Janet Jackson and Justin Timberlake performing at Super Bowl XXXVIII, the infamous wardrobe malfunction mere moments away. i i

    Janet Jackson and Justin Timberlake performing at Super Bowl XXXVIII, the infamous wardrobe malfunction mere moments away. John Zich/John Zich/Corbis hide caption

    itoggle caption John Zich/John Zich/Corbis
    Janet Jackson and Justin Timberlake performing at Super Bowl XXXVIII, the infamous wardrobe malfunction mere moments away.

    Janet Jackson and Justin Timberlake performing at Super Bowl XXXVIII, the infamous wardrobe malfunction mere moments away.

    John Zich/John Zich/Corbis

    "There was a really interesting speech a couple of years ago by one of the co-founders of YouTube, who said ... not only did that turn out to produce the most searched item ever in Internet history at the time ... but, maybe more importantly, is that part of the inspiration for YouTube ... and his recognition and his co-founder's recognition that many people wanted to be able to watch video ... over and over again on the Internet."

    Read 'The Nipple That Launched A Million Google Searches' On Ozy.com.

  • Super Bowl Ads ... For The Ladies

    "Now nearly half the viewership of the Super Bowl are women, so it's been an interesting change in migration over the last 20 years, and yet many of the ads that we've seen in the past clearly still have been geared towards men. But it seems that things are changing. Sarah McLachlan — yep, that one, of Lilith Fair fame — is now doing one of the ads."

    Read 'Is It The Year Of The Female Super Bowl Viewer?' On Ozy.com.

  • Saving The World, One Flush At A Time

    SinkPositive's eco-friendly sink/toilet hybrids decrease water waste. i i

    SinkPositive's eco-friendly sink/toilet hybrids decrease water waste. Steve Cash/Steve Cash Photography hide caption

    itoggle caption Steve Cash/Steve Cash Photography
    SinkPositive's eco-friendly sink/toilet hybrids decrease water waste.

    SinkPositive's eco-friendly sink/toilet hybrids decrease water waste.

    Steve Cash/Steve Cash Photography

    "It's called SinkPositive. A couple years ago, a young woman who was still in college ... encountered an interesting kind of toilet, that was a classic toilet underneath, but on the top someone had put ... a true faucet.

    "The idea was that I wash my hand in the faucet, the water runs down, fills up the toilet, and that's ultimately the water that's ... flushed. It came out of a recognition that something like 30 percent of the wasted water in America, or about $5 billion worth of water, comes from us flushing clean water."

    Read 'Flushed With Pride' On Ozy.com.

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